Thursday, September 29

Tag: AI

Gaming

AI Generated Art Is A Copyright, Ethical And Working Dystopia

It’s August 2022, and by now you’ve no doubt read (or more likely seen) something about AI art. Whether it’s random jokes made for Twitter or paintings that look like they were made by actual human beings, artificial intelligence’s ability to create art has exploded onto the scene over the last few months, and while this has been great news for shitposts and fans of tech, it has also raised a number of important questions and concerns. If you haven’t read or seen anything about the subject, AI art—at least as it exists in the state we know it today—is, as Ahmed Elgammal writing in American Scientist so neatly puts it, made when “artists write algorithms not to follow a set of rules, but to ‘learn’ a specific aesthetic by analyzing thousands of images. The algorithm then tries to generate n...
A Chicago city sensor project goes global
Science

A Chicago city sensor project goes global

Each node in the Array of Things was equipped with an Nvidia graphics processing unit (or GPU) to perform computations on images out in the field and sent only processed data along to the network—a form of edge computing. As an added privacy safeguard, the nodes are designed to be installed temporarily. “I would rather not see edge computing blanketed across the city, where everywhere you walk there’s a camera that’s analyzing what you’re doing,” Catlett says. “That to me is more dystopian than I’d like to see. But I do think that these edge devices have a place for diagnosis. You drop that capability in for a purpose, and then you pull it out.”  Between 2016 and 2019, the team attached 140 AoT nodes to Chicago streetlights. In a participatory process, the team at Argonne and local univer...
Wireless technology ‘re-invents’ predictive maintenance
Science

Wireless technology ‘re-invents’ predictive maintenance

Wireless technology ‘re-invents’ predictive maintenance 30 May, 2022 SKF has joined forces with Amazon Web Services (AWS) to develop a wireless technology which, they say, reinvents the fields of industrial machine reliability and predictive maintenance. The automated condition-monitoring system, called Axios, promises manufacturers a simple, affordable wireless technology for monitoring more of their rotating equipment. The system is the first result of a collaboration between the two companies announced earlier this year. It consists of sensors, gateways and a machine-learning service that is easy to install, commission and cale with no experience needed, allowing sensors and apps to be up and running within minutes. It collects and analyses vibration and temper...