Friday, February 3

Tag: Computational neuroscience

Gaming

Genshin Impact Art Stolen Via AI, Thief Claims To Be Artist

Image: HoYoverseI don’t think I’ve ever seen art theft quite like this before. Two days ago, a Genshin Impact fanartist was painting a new creation on Twitch. Before they could even finish the fanart and post it to Twitter, one of their viewers fed the work-in-progress into an AI generator and “completed” it first. After the artist posted their completed art, the art thief proceeded to demand credit from the original artist. “You posted like 5-6 hours after me, and for that kind of drawing, you can make it fast,” the swindler brazenly tweeted. “You took [a] reference [from] an AI image but at least admit it.”AT is a Korean-language anime artist who streams process videos on Twitch. On October 11, they painted Raiden Shogun from Genshin Impact in front of a live audience. Then a Twitter use...
Gaming

AI Generated Art Is A Copyright, Ethical And Working Dystopia

It’s August 2022, and by now you’ve no doubt read (or more likely seen) something about AI art. Whether it’s random jokes made for Twitter or paintings that look like they were made by actual human beings, artificial intelligence’s ability to create art has exploded onto the scene over the last few months, and while this has been great news for shitposts and fans of tech, it has also raised a number of important questions and concerns. If you haven’t read or seen anything about the subject, AI art—at least as it exists in the state we know it today—is, as Ahmed Elgammal writing in American Scientist so neatly puts it, made when “artists write algorithms not to follow a set of rules, but to ‘learn’ a specific aesthetic by analyzing thousands of images. The algorithm then tries to generate n...