Friday, September 30

Tag: Health Care

MedStar using medics on bicycles to better respond to weekend entertainment district calls
Entertainment

MedStar using medics on bicycles to better respond to weekend entertainment district calls

MedStar using medics on bicycles to better respond to calls New data highlights an ongoing strategy that medics on bicycles are creating in Fort Worth’s entertainment district. FORT WORTH, Texas - New data highlights an ongoing strategy that medics on bicycles are creating in Fort Worth’s entertainment district. Every weekend, thousands of people enjoy an evening at Fort Worth’s West 7th Street District, but with that many people — and often alcohol involved — comes an increase in emergencies. "It is very difficult at 1, 2 o’clock in the morning to get an ambulance down here," explained Matt Zavadsky, with MedStar. "Really, to get even police cars, which is why you see the police department here on bicycles." Since 2018, MedStar has been working on a partnership with Fort Worth PD. It b...
Senators who suffered strokes urge public to prioritize wellness: “You’ve got to look out for your health”
Politics

Senators who suffered strokes urge public to prioritize wellness: “You’ve got to look out for your health”

Pennsylvania U.S. Senate candidate John Fetterman is scheduled to make his return to the campaign trail for the first time since suffering a stroke in May. His circumstance has sparked a conversation with other lawmakers who've also had strokes about the pressures of working in today's fiercely partisan and divided field. "We do have very stressful jobs," Sen. Chris Van Hollen of Maryland told CBS News congressional correspondent Scott MacFarlane. "We're running in a million different directions."On May 15, Van Hollen announced that he suffered a "minor stroke" while delivering a speech.  "I felt lightheaded," he recalled. "I had a pain in my neck and my ears were popping." Doctors later found a tear in one of Van Hollen's veins in the back of hi...
Lawmakers demand change as civilians are hit with “exorbitant” medical bills for emergency treatment at military facilities
Business

Lawmakers demand change as civilians are hit with “exorbitant” medical bills for emergency treatment at military facilities

Democratic Rep. Joaquin Castro and Sen. Elizabeth Warren are calling on the Department of Defense to address its lack of financial relief provided for citizens who receive emergency treatment at U.S. military facilities. The push comes following a recent report from the U.S. Government Accountability Office which found that the Defense Department rarely waives or reduces medical bills issued to citizens in these circumstances despite its ability to do so. "There is a benefit to the military by them being able to treat these patients," Castro said. "So what the military should do is work with private insurers, but also work with patients to reduce these bills and to get rid of exorbitant or extraordinary costs that patients are being billed with."In 2020, Castro initiated legislatio...
Emilia Clarke reflects on “remarkable” ability to speak despite losing “quite a bit” of her brain to aneurysms
Entertainment

Emilia Clarke reflects on “remarkable” ability to speak despite losing “quite a bit” of her brain to aneurysms

About a decade after undergoing surgeries for two ruptured aneurysms, Emilia Clarke revealed that "quite a bit" of her brain no longer functions. The actor called her complete recovery from repeated bouts of internal bleeding "remarkable" in a recent interview.Known best for her long tenure on the HBO Max series "Game of Thrones," Clarke reflected on the life-threatening health challenges she faced in her mid-twenties during an appearance on BBC Sunday Morning this week. As Clarke has previously shared, she was hospitalized in 2011, and again in 2013, for brain hemorrhages that could have been fatal without surgical repair."It was the most excruciating pain," Clarke explained in her conversation with the BBC, referencing the severe headache that came on suddenly during a workout in...
Gray Decries ‘Dark Money’ — But Has Previously Benefitted From It | Politics | Seven Days
Politics

Gray Decries ‘Dark Money’ — But Has Previously Benefitted From It | Politics | Seven Days

In a fundraising email on Wednesday, the campaign for U.S. House candidate Molly Gray went after her chief Democratic rival, Becca Balint, painting an ominous picture of the primary campaign landscape. “If our opponent has it her way, dark money will flood the airwaves and drown out the voices of Vermonters,” Gray’s campaign manager, Samatha Sheehan, wrote. “We don’t know how soon they’ll come for Molly — or how much they’ll spend — but we know now that Super PACs have been invited in by our opponent and we need to be ready.” Sheehan was responding to allegations that Balint, Vermont's Senate president, had used a controversial tactic on her website known as “redboxing.” The practice involves creating a webpage, usually using a red box as a signal, to alert super P...
Politics and pandemic fatigue doom California’s covid vaccine mandates
Politics

Politics and pandemic fatigue doom California’s covid vaccine mandates

In January, progressive California Democrats vowed to adopt the toughest covid vaccine requirements in the country. Their proposals would have required most Californians to get the shots to go to school or work — without allowing exemptions to get out of them. Months later, the lawmakers pulled their bills before the first votes. One major vaccine proposal survives, but faces an uphill battle. It would allow children ages 12 to 17 to get a covid-19 vaccine without parental permission. At least 10 other states permit some minors to do this. Democrats blamed the failure of their vaccine mandates on the changing nature and perception of the pandemic. They said the measures became unnecessary as case rates declined earlier this year and the public became less focused on the pa...
Hundreds rally again in support of abortion rights in Omaha | Politics & Government
Politics

Hundreds rally again in support of abortion rights in Omaha | Politics & Government

Nearly two weeks after a leaked draft opinion suggested the U.S. Supreme Court will overturn Roe v. Wade, hundreds of people gathered in Omaha Saturday to denounce the anticipated decision and reaffirm their commitment to protect abortion rights.The demonstration outside the City-County Building was just one of many throughout the nation as local organizers billed the day as Roe v. Wade Day of Action. Wielding signs with messages like “Keep abortion safe and legal” and “No uterus, no opinion,” attendees rallied and heard from speakers who promised to keep fighting no matter what happens.Saturday’s rally was at least the second one to occur in Omaha since the media outlet Politico broke the story of the draft opinion on May 2.Support for personal choice was one of the commo...
It’s not wedge politics to acknowledge the Conservative party’s stance on abortion
Politics

It’s not wedge politics to acknowledge the Conservative party’s stance on abortion

In light of American news about the potential reversal of Roe v. Wade, it’s important that Canadians do not get smug or complacent about abortion access here. The issues in Canada are very different, as the main barriers to abortion are funding and lack of access outside of urban centres, rather than criminality. Additionally, there are many institutional features in Canada that protect us from a lot of what has happened in the U.S. However, that doesn’t mean that everything is going great here, or that there is no reason to remain vigilant. For starters, the anti-choice movement in Canada is extremely well organized and openly boasts about wanting to influence the political process in order to roll back abortion rights in this country.There is also a lot Canada can be doing to improve acc...
Threat to Roe draws attention to scant support for women having children
Politics

Threat to Roe draws attention to scant support for women having children

The expectation that Supreme Court is about to scrap decades of federal protections of abortion rights is highlighting another issue: the lack of resources and support available for women to have and raise children. More women living in states without abortion access, should Roe v. Wade be overturned, will likely carry to term. Yet, not one of the two dozen states with laws on the books restricting abortion access offers paid family leave.Eight of them have opted out of expanding Medicaid coverage under the health care law, which covers pregnancy through postpartum for low-income Americans. And Mississippi, whose abortion restriction law is at the heart of an impending Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, ranks as the state with the highest ...